Stanley B. Prusiner

About Stanley B. Prusiner

Who is it?: Neurologist and Biochemist
Birth Day: May 28, 1942
Birth Place: Des Moines, Iowa, United States, United States
Residence: San Francisco, United States
Alma mater: University of Pennsylvania (BS, MD)
Known for: Prions Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease
Spouse(s): Sandy Turk Prusiner
Children: two
Awards: Potamkin Prize (1991) Dickson Prize (1993) Richard Lounsbery Award (1993) Lasker Award (1994) Keio Medical Science Prize (1996) Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (1997) ForMemRS (1997) Sir Hans Krebs Medal (1999)
Fields: Neurology Infectious diseases
Institutions: University of California, Berkeley University of California, San Francisco
Website: ind.ucsf.edu/ind/aboutus/faculty/prusiners

Stanley B. Prusiner

Stanley B. Prusiner was born on May 28, 1942 in Des Moines, Iowa, United States, United States, is Neurologist and Biochemist. Stanley B. Prusiner is an American neurologist and biochemist who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1997 for his prion research. He coined the term prion, which comes from the words "proteinaceous" and "infectious” to refer to a class of infectious self-reproducing pathogens primarily or solely composed of protein. The son of an architect, he had a comfortable upbringing, typical of American boys hailing from well-to-do families. Intelligent and interested in scientific pursuits from a young age, he was referred to as the little Genius for developing a bug repellent as a school boy. He earned a degree in chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania and later received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He spent a few years in biochemical research before becoming a professor of neurology and biochemistry at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, from where he had completed his internship. Over the course of his research, he began studying a particular class of neurodegenerative disorders—the spongiform encephalopathies—that caused progressive dementia and death in humans and animals. This work eventually led to the groundbreaking findings that earned him the Nobel Prize. In addition to the Nobel Prize, he is also the recipient of several other prestigious awards in science fields.
Stanley B. Prusiner is a member of Scientists

Does Stanley B. Prusiner Dead or Alive?

As per our current Database, Stanley B. Prusiner is still alive (as per Wikipedia, Last update: May 10, 2020).

🎂 Stanley B. Prusiner - Age, Bio, Faces and Birthday

Currently, Stanley B. Prusiner is 78 years, 7 months and 28 days old. Stanley B. Prusiner will celebrate 79rd birthday on a Friday 28th of May 2021. Below we countdown to Stanley B. Prusiner upcoming birthday.

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Popular As Stanley B. Prusiner
Occupation Scientists
Age 78 years old
Zodiac Sign Gemini
Born May 28, 1942 (Des Moines, Iowa, United States, United States)
Birthday May 28
Town/City Des Moines, Iowa, United States, United States
Nationality United States

🌙 Zodiac

Stanley B. Prusiner’s zodiac sign is Gemini. According to astrologers, Gemini is expressive and quick-witted, it represents two different personalities in one and you will never be sure which one you will face. They are sociable, communicative and ready for fun, with a tendency to suddenly get serious, thoughtful and restless. They are fascinated with the world itself, extremely curious, with a constant feeling that there is not enough time to experience everything they want to see.

🌙 Chinese Zodiac Signs

Stanley B. Prusiner was born in the Year of the Horse. Those born under the Chinese Zodiac sign of the Horse love to roam free. They’re energetic, self-reliant, money-wise, and they enjoy traveling, love and intimacy. They’re great at seducing, sharp-witted, impatient and sometimes seen as a drifter. Compatible with Dog or Tiger.

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Awards and nominations:

Stanley Prusiner won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1997 for his work in proposing an explanation for the cause of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") and its human equivalent, Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. In this work, he coined the term prion, which comes from the words "proteinaceous" and "infectious," in 1982 to refer to a previously undescribed form of infection due to protein misfolding.

Prusiner was elected to the National Academy of Science in 1992 and to its governing council in 2007. He is also an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1993), a Foreign Member of the Royal Society (ForMemRS) in 1997, and the American Philosophical Society (1998), the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts (2003), and the Institute of Medicine.

Biography/Timeline

1974

After three years at NIH, Prusiner returned to UCSF to complete a residency in neurology. Upon completion of the residency in 1974, Prusiner joined the faculty of the UCSF neurology department. Since that time, Prusiner has held various faculty and visiting faculty positions at both UCSF and UC Berkeley.

1992

Prusiner was elected to the National Academy of Science in 1992 and to its governing council in 2007. He is also an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1993), a Foreign Member of the Royal Society (ForMemRS) in 1997, and the American Philosophical Society (1998), the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts (2003), and the Institute of Medicine.

1997

Stanley Prusiner won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1997 for his work in proposing an explanation for the cause of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") and its human equivalent, Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. In this work, he coined the term prion, which comes from the words "proteinaceous" and "infectious," in 1982 to refer to a previously undescribed form of infection due to protein misfolding.

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