Rolf M. Zinkernagel

About Rolf M. Zinkernagel

Who is it?: Immunologist
Birth Day: January 06, 1944
Birth Place: Riehen, Basel-Stadt, Switzerland, Swiss
Alma mater: Australian National University (PhD, 1975) University of Basel (MD, 1970)
Known for: Cytotoxic T cells
Awards: Ernst Jung Prize (1982) Mack-Forster Prize (1985) Gairdner Foundation International Award (1986) Louis-Jeantet Prize for Medicine (1988) Christoforo Colombo Award (1992) Albert Lasker Medical Research Award (1995) Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (1996) ForMemRS (1998) AC (1999) FAA
Fields: Immunology
Institutions: University of Zurich
Thesis: The role of the H-2 gene complex in cell-mediated immunity to viral and bacterial infections in mice (1975)
Website: www.immunology.uzh.ch/aboutus/emeriti/zinkernagel.html

Rolf M. Zinkernagel

Rolf M. Zinkernagel was born on January 06, 1944 in Riehen, Basel-Stadt, Switzerland, Swiss, is Immunologist. Rolf Martin Zinkernagel is an eminent Swiss immunologist, who along with Peter C. Doherty, won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1996 "for their discoveries concerning the specificity of the cell mediated immune defence". After receiving his degree in medicine, Zinkernagel first wanted to work among leprosy patients in Africa, but was refused. Next, he tried his hand at surgery at local hospital; but soon realized he was not cut out for such a job. So, he entered University of Basel to earn his M.D and then joined University of Lausanne for post-doctoral work. While working at Lausanne, he developed an interest in immunology and wanted to carry on further research on this subject. Finally he received such a scope at the Australian National University and set out for Canberra. There, working with Peter Doherty, he discovered how T-cells recognize virus-infected host cells and destroy them. Their work also threw light on the function of the major histocompatibility complex. Around two decades later, they received the Nobel Prize for this work. Zinkernagel spent the last years of his working life at the University of Zurich, continuing to work on immune protection and immune-pathology. Finally he retired on 2008; but continues to work in other capacities, trying to further biomedical research in Europe, especially Switzerland.
Rolf M. Zinkernagel is a member of Scientists

Does Rolf M. Zinkernagel Dead or Alive?

As per our current Database, Rolf M. Zinkernagel is still alive (as per Wikipedia, Last update: May 10, 2020).

🎂 Rolf M. Zinkernagel - Age, Bio, Faces and Birthday

Currently, Rolf M. Zinkernagel is 77 years, 3 months and 5 days old. Rolf M. Zinkernagel will celebrate 78rd birthday on a Thursday 6th of January 2022. Below we countdown to Rolf M. Zinkernagel upcoming birthday.

Days
Hours
Minutes
Seconds
Popular As Rolf M. Zinkernagel
Occupation Scientists
Age 76 years old
Zodiac Sign Aquarius
Born January 06, 1944 (Riehen, Basel-Stadt, Switzerland, Swiss)
Birthday January 06
Town/City Riehen, Basel-Stadt, Switzerland, Swiss
Nationality Swiss

🌙 Zodiac

Rolf M. Zinkernagel’s zodiac sign is Aquarius. According to astrologers, the presence of Aries always marks the beginning of something energetic and turbulent. They are continuously looking for dynamic, speed and competition, always being the first in everything - from work to social gatherings. Thanks to its ruling planet Mars and the fact it belongs to the element of Fire (just like Leo and Sagittarius), Aries is one of the most active zodiac signs. It is in their nature to take action, sometimes before they think about it well.

🌙 Chinese Zodiac Signs

Rolf M. Zinkernagel was born in the Year of the Monkey. Those born under the Chinese Zodiac sign of the Monkey thrive on having fun. They’re energetic, upbeat, and good at listening but lack self-control. They like being active and stimulated and enjoy pleasing self before pleasing others. They’re heart-breakers, not good at long-term relationships, morals are weak. Compatible with Rat or Dragon.

Some Rolf M. Zinkernagel images

Awards and nominations:

Together with the Australian Peter C. Doherty he received the 1996 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery of how the immune system recognizes virus-infected cells. With this he became the 24th Swiss Nobel laureate. In 1999 he was awarded an honorary Companion of the Order of Australia (AC), Australia's highest civilian honour, for his scientific work with Doherty.

Viruses infect host cells and reproduce inside them. Killer T-cells destroy those infected cells so that the viruses can't reproduce. Zinkernagel and Doherty discovered that, in order for killer T-cells to recognize infected cells, they had to recognize two molecules on the surface of the cell—not only the virus antigen, but also a molecule of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). This recognition was done by a T-cell receptor on the surface of the T-cell. The MHC was previously identified as being responsible for the rejection of incompatible tissues during transplantation. Zinkernagel and Doherty discovered that the MHC was responsible for the body fighting meningitis viruses too.

In addition to the Nobel Prize, he also won the Cloëtta Prize in 1981, the Cancer Research Institute William B. Coley Award in 1987 and the Albert Lasker Medical Research Award in 1995. Zinkernagel was elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society (ForMeRS) in 1998.

Biography/Timeline

1970

Zinkernagel received his MD degree from the University of Basel in 1970 and his PhD from the Australian National University in 1975.

1981

In addition to the Nobel Prize, he also won the Cloëtta Prize in 1981, the Cancer Research Institute william B. Coley Award in 1987 and the Albert Lasker Medical Research Award in 1995. Zinkernagel was elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society (ForMeRS) in 1998.

1996

Together with the Australian Peter C. Doherty he received the 1996 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery of how the immune system recognizes virus-infected cells. With this he became the 24th Swiss Nobel laureate. In 1999 he was awarded an honorary Companion of the Order of Australia (AC), Australia's highest civilian honour, for his scientific work with Doherty.

2014

Viruses infect host cells and reproduce inside them. Killer T-cells destroy those infected cells so that the viruses can't reproduce. Zinkernagel and Doherty discovered that, in order for killer T-cells to recognize infected cells, they had to recognize two molecules on the surface of the cell—not only the virus antigen, but also a molecule of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). This recognition was done by a T-cell receptor on the surface of the T-cell. The MHC was previously identified as being responsible for the rejection of incompatible tissues during transplantation. Zinkernagel and Doherty discovered that the MHC was responsible for the body fighting meningitis viruses too.

Rolf M. Zinkernagel trend