Flame

About Flame

Who is it?: Actress, Camera Department
Birth Day: March 19, 1930
Birth Place:  Texas, United States

Flame

Flame was born on March 19, 1930 in  Texas, United States, is Actress, Camera Department. Flame is a cute, petite redhead who grew up in Texas. She began topless dancing at age 16 and started her adult film career with the feature Dream Lover (1991). Although small in stature, she was renowned for the ferocity of her performances and her willingness to do just about anything in front of a camera. She married the brother of fellow porn star Raven on March 5, 1995, and stopped performing, although she has continued to appear in S&M videos.
Flame is a member of Actress

Does Flame Dead or Alive?

As per our current Database, Flame is still alive (as per Wikipedia, Last update: May 10, 2020).

🎂 Flame - Age, Bio, Faces and Birthday

Currently, Flame is 91 years, 2 months and 27 days old. Flame will celebrate 92rd birthday on a Saturday 19th of March 2022. Below we countdown to Flame upcoming birthday.

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Popular As Flame
Occupation Actress
Age 90 years old
Zodiac Sign Aries
Born March 19, 1930 ( Texas, United States)
Birthday March 19
Town/City  Texas, United States
Nationality United States

🌙 Zodiac

Flame’s zodiac sign is Aries. According to astrologers, the presence of Aries always marks the beginning of something energetic and turbulent. They are continuously looking for dynamic, speed and competition, always being the first in everything - from work to social gatherings. Thanks to its ruling planet Mars and the fact it belongs to the element of Fire (just like Leo and Sagittarius), Aries is one of the most active zodiac signs. It is in their nature to take action, sometimes before they think about it well.

🌙 Chinese Zodiac Signs

Flame was born in the Year of the Horse. Those born under the Chinese Zodiac sign of the Horse love to roam free. They’re energetic, self-reliant, money-wise, and they enjoy traveling, love and intimacy. They’re great at seducing, sharp-witted, impatient and sometimes seen as a drifter. Compatible with Dog or Tiger.

Biography/Timeline

1817

At temperatures as low as 120 °C (248 °F), fuel-air mixtures can react chemically and produce very weak flames called cool flames. The phenomenon was discovered by Humphry Davy in 1817. The process depends on a fine balance of temperature and concentration of the reacting mixture, and if conditions are right it can initiate without any external ignition source. Cyclical variations in the balance of chemicals, particularly of intermediate products in the reaction, give oscillations in the flame, with a typical temperature variation of about 100 °C (212 °F), or between "cool" and full ignition. Sometimes the variation can lead to an explosion.

2000

In the year 2000, experiments by NASA confirmed that gravity plays an indirect role in flame formation and composition. The Common distribution of a flame under normal gravity conditions depends on convection, as soot tends to rise to the top of a flame (such as in a candle in normal gravity conditions), making it yellow. In microgravity or zero gravity environment, such as in orbit, natural convection no longer occurs and the flame becomes spherical, with a tendency to become bluer and more efficient. There are several possible explanations for this difference, of which the most likely is the hypothesis that the temperature is sufficiently evenly distributed that soot is not formed and complete combustion occurs. Experiments by NASA reveal that diffusion flames in microgravity allow more soot to be completely oxidized after they are produced than do diffusion flames on Earth, because of a series of mechanisms that behave differently in microgravity when compared to normal gravity conditions. These discoveries have potential applications in applied science and industry, especially concerning fuel efficiency.

2013

Flame temperatures of Common items include a candle at 829 °C (1,500 °F), a blow torch – at around 1,600 °C (2,900 °F) a propane torch at 1,995 °C (3,620 °F), or a much hotter oxyacetylene combustion at 3,000 °C (5,400 °F).

Some Flame images

Flame trend

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