Barbara Ehrenreich

About Barbara Ehrenreich

Who is it?: Writer & Activist
Birth Day: August 26, 1941
Birth Place: Butte, United States
Occupation: Social critic, journalist, author, activist
Genre: Nonfiction, investigative journalism
Children: 2

Barbara Ehrenreich

Barbara Ehrenreich was born on August 26, 1941 in Butte, United States, is Writer & Activist. Barbara Ehrenreich is an American writer and political activist. Throughout her life, she has proved herself as one of the most influential journalistic voices of her generation. After completing her studies, she turned to political and anti-war activism. She became a victim of sexist behavior during her pregnancy at a medical care facility and underwent political as well as personal transformation. Later, she got involved with the ‘women's health movement’ and eventually decided to become a full time writer. She worked mostly in health-related research, advocacy as well as activism and also wrote several feminist books on the history and politics of women's health. A self-described fourth-generation atheist, she has authored more than twenty books in her career. Her main focus has been on the contemporary socio-cultural landscape, with emphasis on feminism and the plight of the poor. Her work life branches into three tracks—journalism, activism and books. She shares her ideas through essays, opinion pieces, and now-a-days blogs, and her activism emphasizes on various issues such as health care, peace, women's rights, and economic justice. She continues to encourage everybody towards building a better society for women and lead the way for future generations.
Barbara Ehrenreich is a member of Writers

Does Barbara Ehrenreich Dead or Alive?

As per our current Database, Barbara Ehrenreich is still alive (as per Wikipedia, Last update: May 10, 2020).

🎂 Barbara Ehrenreich - Age, Bio, Faces and Birthday

Currently, Barbara Ehrenreich is 79 years, 4 months and 21 days old. Barbara Ehrenreich will celebrate 80rd birthday on a Thursday 26th of August 2021. Below we countdown to Barbara Ehrenreich upcoming birthday.

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Popular As Barbara Ehrenreich
Occupation Writers
Age 79 years old
Zodiac Sign Virgo
Born August 26, 1941 (Butte, United States)
Birthday August 26
Town/City Butte, United States
Nationality United States

🌙 Zodiac

Barbara Ehrenreich’s zodiac sign is Virgo. According to astrologers, Virgos are always paying attention to the smallest details and their deep sense of humanity makes them one of the most careful signs of the zodiac. Their methodical approach to life ensures that nothing is left to chance, and although they are often tender, their heart might be closed for the outer world. This is a sign often misunderstood, not because they lack the ability to express, but because they won’t accept their feelings as valid, true, or even relevant when opposed to reason. The symbolism behind the name speaks well of their nature, born with a feeling they are experiencing everything for the first time.

🌙 Chinese Zodiac Signs

Barbara Ehrenreich was born in the Year of the Snake. Those born under the Chinese Zodiac sign of the Snake are seductive, gregarious, introverted, generous, charming, good with money, analytical, insecure, jealous, slightly dangerous, smart, they rely on gut feelings, are hard-working and intelligent. Compatible with Rooster or Ox.

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Awards and nominations:

In 1980, Ehrenreich shared the National Magazine Award for excellence in reporting with colleagues at Mother Jones magazine for the cover story The Corporate Crime of the Century, about "what happens after the U.S. government forces a dangerous drug, pesticide or other product off the domestic market, then the manufacturer sells that same product, frequently with the direct support of the State Department, throughout the rest of the world."

In 1998 the American Humanist Association named her "Humanist of the Year."

In 2000, she received the Sidney Hillman Award for journalism for the Harper's article "Nickel and Dimed," which was later published as a chapter in her book of the same title.

In 2002, she won a National Magazine Award for her essay "Welcome to Cancerland: A mammogram leads to a cult of pink kitsch," which describes Ehrenreich's own experience of being diagnosed with breast cancer, and describes what she calls the "breast cancer cult," which "serves as an accomplice in global poisoning -- normalizing cancer, prettying it up, even presenting it, perversely, as a positive and enviable experience."

In 2004, she received the Puffin/Nation Prize for Creative Citizenship, awarded jointly by the Puffin Foundation of New Jersey and The Nation Institute to an American who challenges the status quo "through distinctive, courageous, imaginative, socially responsible work of significance."

In 2007, she received the "Freedom from Want" Medal, awarded by the Roosevelt Institute in celebration of "those whose life's work embodies FDR's Four Freedoms."

Ehrenreich has received a Ford Foundation award for humanistic perspectives on contemporary society (1982), a Guggenheim Fellowship (1987–88) and a grant for research and writing from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation (1995). She has received honorary degrees from Reed College, the State University of New York at Old Westbury, the College of Wooster in Ohio, John Jay College, UMass Lowell and La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia.

Biography/Timeline

1963

Ehrenreich studied chemistry at Reed College, graduating in 1963. Her senior thesis was entitled Electrochemical oscillations of the silicon anode. In 1968, she received a Ph.D in cellular immunology from Rockefeller University.

1966

She has been married and divorced twice. She met her first husband, John Ehrenreich, during an anti-war activism campaign in New York City, and they married in 1966. He is a clinical Psychologist, and they co-wrote several books about health policy and labor issues before divorcing in 1977. In 1983, she married Gary Stevenson, a union organizer for the Teamsters. She divorced Stevenson in 1993.

1970

Ehrenreich has two children. Born in 1970, her daughter Rosa was named after Rosa Parks, Rosa Luxemburg, and a great-grandmother. She is a Virginia-based law professor, national security and foreign policy expert and Writer. Born in 1972, her son Ben is a Journalist and Novelist in Los Angeles.

1972

After completing her doctorate, Ehrenreich did not pursue a career in science. Instead, she worked first as an analyst with the Bureau of the Budget in New York City and with the Health Policy Advisory Center, and later as an assistant professor at the State University of New York at Old Westbury. In 1972, Ehrenreich began co-teaching a course on women and health with feminist Journalist and academic Deirdre English. Through the rest of the seventies, Ehrenreich worked mostly in health-related research, advocacy and activism, including co-writing, with English, several feminist books and pamphlets on the history and politics of women's health. During this period she began speaking frequently at conferences staged by women's health centers and women's groups, by universities, and by the United States government. She also spoke regularly about socialist feminism and about feminism in general.

1979

Between 1979 and 1981, she served as an adjunct associate professor at New York University and as a visiting professor at the University of Missouri at Columbia and at Sangamon State University. She lectured at the University of California, Santa Barbara, was a writer-in-residence at the Ohio State University, Wayne Morse chair at the University of Oregon, and a teaching fellow at the graduate school of journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. She has been a fellow at the New York Institute for the Humanities, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the Institute for Policy Studies, and the New York-based Society of American Historians.

1980

In 1980, Ehrenreich shared the National Magazine Award for excellence in reporting with colleagues at Mother Jones magazine for the cover story The Corporate Crime of the Century, about "what happens after the U.S. government forces a dangerous drug, pesticide or other product off the domestic market, then the manufacturer sells that same product, frequently with the direct support of the State Department, throughout the rest of the world."

1982

Ehrenreich has received a Ford Foundation award for humanistic perspectives on contemporary society (1982), a Guggenheim Fellowship (1987–88) and a grant for research and writing from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation (1995). She has received honorary degrees from Reed College, the State University of New York at Old Westbury, the College of Wooster in Ohio, John Jay College, UMass Lowell and La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia.

1993

"As a little girl," she told The New York Times in 1993, "I would go to school and have to decide if my parents were the evil people they were talking about, part of the Red Menace we read about in the Weekly Reader, just because my mother was a liberal Democrat who would always talk about racial injustice." Her Father was a copper miner who went to the Montana State School of Mines (now part of the University of Montana), and then to Carnegie Mellon University. He eventually became a senior executive at the Gillette Corporation. Her parents later divorced.

1998

In 1998 the American Humanist Association named her "Humanist of the Year."

1999

Ehrenreich was born Barbara Alexander to Isabelle Oxley and Ben Howes Alexander in Butte, Montana, which she describes as then being "a bustling, brawling, blue collar mining town." In an interview on C-SPAN, she characterized her parents as "strong union people" with two family rules: "never cross a picket line and never vote Republican." In a talk she gave in 1999, Ehrenreich called herself a "fourth-generation atheist."

2000

In 2000, Ehrenreich endorsed the Presidential campaign of Ralph Nader; in 2004, she urged voters to support John Kerry in the swing states. In February 2008, Ehrenreich expressed support for Senator Barack Obama in the 2008 U.S. presidential campaign.

2001

Ehrenreich was diagnosed with breast cancer shortly after the release of her book Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America. This resulted in the award-winning article "Welcome to Cancerland," published in the November 2001 issue of Harper's Magazine. The article inspired the 2011 documentary Pink Ribbons, Inc..

2002

In 2002, she won a National Magazine Award for her essay "Welcome to Cancerland: A mammogram leads to a cult of pink kitsch," which describes Ehrenreich's own experience of being diagnosed with breast cancer, and describes what she calls the "breast cancer cult," which "serves as an accomplice in global poisoning -- normalizing cancer, prettying it up, even presenting it, perversely, as a positive and enviable experience."

2004

Filling in for a vacationing Thomas Friedman as a columnist with the New York Times in 2004, Ehrenreich wrote about how, in the fight for women's reproductive rights, "it's the women who shrink from acknowledging their own abortions who really irk me," and said that she herself "had two abortions during my all-too-fertile years." In her 1990 book of essays The Worst Years of Our Lives, she wrote that "the one regret I have about my own abortions is that they cost money that might otherwise have been spent on something more pleasurable, like taking the kids to movies and theme parks."

2006

In 2006, Ehrenreich founded United Professionals, an organization described as "a nonprofit, non-partisan membership organization for white-collar workers, regardless of profession or employment status. We reach out to all unemployed, underemployed, and anxiously employed workers—people who bought the American dream that education and credentials could lead to a secure middle class life, but now find their lives disrupted by forces beyond their control."

2007

In 2007, she received the "Freedom from Want" Medal, awarded by the Roosevelt Institute in celebration of "those whose life's work embodies FDR's Four Freedoms."

2013

As of 2013 Ehrenreich is an honorary co-chair of the Democratic Socialists of America. She also serves on the NORML Board of Directors, the Institute for Policy Studies Board of Trustees and the Editorial Board of The Nation. She has served on the editorial boards of Social Policy, Ms., Mother Jones, Seven Days, Lear's, The New Press, and Culturefront, and as a contributing Editor to Harper's.

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